THE RED PLANET IS NOT SO RED AFTER ALL : NASA RELEASES OVER 1,000 NEW IMAGES OF MARS

We’ve always been led to believe that Mars is red. That’s why it’s nicknamed The Red Planet. But as you can see from these stunning new images recently released by NASA, the surface of Mars is actually a lot more colorful than we think.

The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) was launched into space in 2005, and since that time, it’s rotated around the red planet, snapping photos of all that it sees. This spacecraft transmits images back to Earth every month, but the most recent batch—1,035 pictures total—is especially meaningful: the geometry of our planet and Mars had lined up just right, and on May 22, Mars and the Sun were on opposite sides of our sky. This allowed for clear communications, at least for a few weeks, between Mars and Earth.

The MRO’s images are exciting for NASA—they give us a better perspective of Mars’ surface and could help map potential landing sites for the future. Check out some of our favorites, below, and see the entire compelling collection in the HiRise image catalog.

 

Anaglyph of the Basal Scarp of Olympus Mons Volcano

Anaglyph of the Basal Scarp of Olympus Mons Volcano

 

Candidate Impact Site

Candidate Impact Site

 

Central Deposits in Pasteur Crater

Central Deposits in Pasteur Crater

 

Crater Floor in Arabia Terra Region

Crater Floor in Arabia Terra Region

 

Crater in Hesperia Planum

Crater in Hesperia Planum

 

Dark Sand and Bright Bedrock in Terra Meridiani

Dark Sand and Bright Bedrock in Terra Meridiani

 

Dune Field with Bright Fans

Dune Field with Bright Fans

 

Dunes Dubbed Tleilax

Dunes Dubbed Tleilax

 

Dunes

Dunes

 

Edge of North Polar Erg Dubbed Windy City

Edge of North Polar Erg Dubbed Windy City

 

Evidence of Multiple Episodes of Gully Formation

Evidence of Multiple Episodes of Gully Formation

 

Exposure of Polar Layered Deposits with Unconformities

Exposure of Polar Layered Deposits with Unconformities

 

Gullies in Dunes Dubbed Kolhar

Gullies in Dunes Dubbed Kolhar

 

Gusev Crater

Gusev Crater

 

Landforms at West End of Her Desher Vallis

Landforms at West End of Her Desher Vallis

 

Monitor Slopes of Crater in Melas Chasma

Monitor Slopes of Crater in Melas Chasma

 

North Polar Layered Deposits in Head Scarp of Chasma Boreale

North Polar Layered Deposits in Head Scarp of Chasma Boreale

 

Possible Phyllosilicates in Ejecta of Small Crater in Tyrrhena Terra

Possible Phyllosilicates in Ejecta of Small Crater in Tyrrhena Terra

 

Scalloped Depressions with Layers in the Northern Plains

Scalloped Depressions with Layers in the Northern Plains

 

Sediment on South Side of Rock

Sediment on South Side of Rock

 

Sharp Scarp and Varied Features

Sharp Scarp and Varied Features

 

Southern spring sunshine is causing the seasonal carbon dioxide cap at the south pole to evaporate.

Southern spring sunshine is causing the seasonal carbon dioxide cap at the south pole to evaporate.

 

Steep Slopes of Hebes Chasma

Steep Slopes of Hebes Chasma

 

Very Fresh Small Impact Crater

Very Fresh Small Impact Crater

 

White Rock Landform in Pollack Crater

White Rock Landform in Pollack Crater

 

Winter View of Dunes

Winter View of Dunes

Check Out The Full Gallery [ HiRise ]

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